Kansas City District News Stories

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  • January

    Missouri River navigation restoration efforts hit major milestone despite challenges

    2024 will mark five years since the historic flood of 2019 in Kansas City and the surrounding region. Water levels on the Missouri River reached heights not seen for decades and caused an estimated $2.9 billion in damages across the Midwest. While the historic flooding impacted many in the area in ways they will likely not soon forget, it might be hard to believe that just a couple of years after the historic flooding, the region entered a period of historic drought. With water levels now at historic lows, repairing the river’s navigation channel to its pre-flood condition has not been an easy feat.
  • September

    Paddling the distance

    Each year, hundreds of adventurous paddlers brave 340 miles of the Lower Missouri River within a matter of 3 1/2 days as part of the annual Missouri American Water MR340 race hosted by Missouri River Relief. As the world’s longest non-stop river race, MR340 is a test of endurance. It is also an opportunity for people around the nation and world to learn more about the Missouri River and how the Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages the lower Missouri River Basin. Within the training all paddlers must do before the race, a warning is given to keep an eye out for the structures along the Missouri River including dikes, chutes and revetments. These structures are placed and maintained by the Kansas City District, so the Missouri River is able to self-maintain a navigation channel.
  • June

    River training structure repairs progressing on Missouri River: Bipartisan Infrastructure Law pivotal

    The flood of 2019 made apparent the need for extensive repairs on the Missouri River training devices – dikes and revetments – that direct the downstream flow into the navigation channel to keep it deep enough for boat traffic and generally clear of debris. The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law allocated $248 million to repair those devices that are on the lower stretch of the Missouri River.
  • Young and Promising: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District Employee Receives Industry 40 Under 40 Award

    The inland maritime profession is a unique and demanding one. Tackling the challenges associated with the career field requires determination and innovation. Every now and then, an individual comes along who, early in their career, makes an impact that is felt across the industry. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District employee Dane Morris is one of these individuals. This June, Morris was recognized with a 40 Under 40 Award at the 2023 Inland Marine Expo in Nashville, Tennessee, also known as IMX, for his outstanding achievements. IMX is an annual event where inland marine professionals collaborate to make maritime transportation more cost-effective, safe and environmentally friendly. Each year, the event recognizes a group of individuals under the age of 40 who have made significant contributions to the inland marine transportation industry and show promise in shaping its future. These award recipients are young professionals in a variety of career fields within the industry, including engineers, surveyors and professionals working on towboats, passenger vehicles or other commercial craft. This year, Morris was the only employee of the federal government to receive the honor.
  • December

    U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center assists Kansas City Corps with hydrodynamic dredge

    In a demonstration of collaboration and innovation, the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center deployed an experimental asset and team of experts to the Missouri River in the Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, to assist in dredging shallow areas called shoals in the navigation river channel.
  • June

    Kayaks and canoes: best view of beauty on the Missouri River

    Whether by kayak, canoe or raft, you can float the Missouri River from Rulo, Nebraska to St. Louis, Mo. fully in the Kansas City District. These 498 miles of river have some of the richest viewing in our area. You will see a palette of colors. In the spring and summer, mostly shades of green. American Sycamore, Silver Maple, Box Elder and River Birch are some of the trees that line the banks. Sand bars offer an opportunity to picnic – with caution as not to disturb wildlife particularly on those marked for endangered species.
  • February

    Navigating and maintaining the river

    Navigation is one of the eight authorized purposes of the Missouri River that mandates the Corps of Engineers to manage the navigation channel between Sioux City, Iowa and St. Louis, Missouri. The Rivers and Harbors Act of 1945 calls for a 9-foot deep and minimum 300-foot wide channel. Today, the focus of the Corps of Engineers navigation mission is to provide safe, reliable, efficient and environmentally sustainable waterborne transportation system for movement of commerce, national security needs and recreation. In order to meet this mission, the Corps focuses on repairs to river structures from damage such as ice, debris, scouring and high water velocity.
  • River outreach underway

    Communication is key, and the Kansas City District understands that concept and strives to implement it. “We have more stakeholders than we know,” said John Grothaus, Kansas City District’s chief of planning. “We are actively searching for them, working to communicate with them to learn their needs while informing what the Corps of Engineers does and how we can best serve the public.”
  • November

    Groundbreaking kicks off first of a four-phase Missouri River Levee Project

    A groundbreaking event occurred Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016 for the first of four phases of the overall St. Joseph levee project. The City of St. Joseph, Mo., and Buchanan County hosted the event for project sponsors and stakeholders adjacent to the MRLS R471-460 levee unit northeast of Rosecrans Memorial Airport.
  • October

    Rehab of deteriorated Jersey Creek sheet pile wall complete

    The Kansas City District recently completed the Fairfax Jersey Creek sheet pile wall project located near Kaw Point along the Missouri River near Kansas City.