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Dam Safety Day recognized in Kansas City District

Kansas City District, Northwestern Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Published May 29, 2020
Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 18

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 18

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 12 of 18

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 13 of 18

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 14 of 18

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 15 of 18

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 16 of 18

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 17 of 18

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 18 of 18

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

Living with dams is a shared responsibility and requires constant assessment, continuous communication and engagement with local public and emergency management agencies. The Kansas City District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, operates and manages 18 dams in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa. Flood control serves as the primary purpose of these dams. Corps reservoirs provide many other benefits including recreation activities.

As we enter the summer months, whether you are boating, fishing, swimming, hiking, biking, camping, or just enjoying the view, please make sure your activities are safe and you have proper safety equipment. Be prepared! Life jacket worn . . . nobody mourns!

On May 31st, the Corps will observe National Dam Safety Awareness Day to commemorate the failure of the South Fork Dam in Johnstown, Pennsylvania on May 31, 1889 that killed more than 2,200 people marking the worst dam failure in U.S. history.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers operates and maintains over 700 dams. Dam safety and life safety are paramount to us. The Kansas City District regularly assesses the conditions of its dams to ensure they will function as designed during a flood event.  These dams performed as designed during the 2019 flood event, holding back over 9 million acre-feet of water until downstream conditions allowed the water to be released safely.

To learn more about National Dam Safety Awareness Day, please visit http://www.usace.army.mil/Missions/Civil-Works/Dam-Safety-Program/.

The Kansas City District is a team of dedicated professionals with a strong heritage and proven results who, in collaboration with our partners, proudly serve in the Heartland providing leadership, technical excellence, and innovative solutions to the nation's most complex problems.


Contact
Kansas City District Public Affairs
816-389-3486 / 2214
cenwk-pa@usace.army.mil
Kansas City, Mo.

Release no. 20-020