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Perry Lake water level low, Corps encourages visitors to use caution

Published Aug. 10, 2018
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Perry Lake urge recreation visitors to be cautions of lower than usual lake levels. Shallow points and normally submerged hazards are becoming a common sight. It's important for all visitors to understand the lake and risks associated with recreating in low water.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Perry Lake urge recreation visitors to be cautions of lower than usual lake levels. Shallow points and normally submerged hazards are becoming a common sight. It's important for all visitors to understand the lake and risks associated with recreating in low water.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Perry Lake urge recreation visitors to be cautions of lower than usual lake levels. Shallow points and normally submerged hazards are becoming a common sight. It's important for all visitors to understand the lake and risks associated with recreating in low water.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Perry Lake urge recreation visitors to be cautions of lower than usual lake levels. Shallow points and normally submerged hazards are becoming a common sight. It's important for all visitors to understand the lake and risks associated with recreating in low water.

PERRY, Kan. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Perry Lake urges recreation visitors to be cautious of lower than usual lake levels. Shallow points and normally submerged hazards are becoming a common sight. It's important for all visitors to understand the lake and risks associated with recreating in low water.

"As area drought conditions continue, Perry Lake pool levels are currently 4 feet 6 inches below our typical summer pool level,” says Jason Hurley, Perry Lake park manager. “We want all boaters to use extra caution on the lake, slow down and understand that areas you have historically boated in may now pose a hazard due to the low water levels. It is very important to obey all buoys and understand that buoys may not be marking all areas with low water. Keep in mind that buoys are marking the general hazard area, give plenty of room around the buoyed area and slow down.”

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers urges boaters to operate vessels in the open water or channel, avoid shorelines, stay alert and learn the lake, be prepared, understand the importance of water safety and be alert to expect the unexpected. It’s imperative to wear a life jacket and to be familiar with your location and the body of water you are visiting. Boaters in need of assistance can dial *HP.

For additional information contact the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Perry Lake at 785-597-5144.


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Release no. 18-047