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Camp Adair

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Camp Adair, which comprises approximately 56,815.17 acres, is located approximately 9 miles north of Corvallis, Oregon in Polk, Benton, and Linn counties. Camp Adair is located at approximately latitude 44° 42' 21" North and longitude 123° 14' 28" West. The Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) property is located in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 10 and Oregon's 4th and 5th Congressional Districts.

Camp Adair

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Camp Adair, which comprises approximately 56,815.17 acres, is located approximately 9 miles north of Corvallis, Oregon in Polk, Benton, and Linn counties. Camp Adair is located at approximately latitude 44° 42' 21" North and longitude 123° 14' 28" West. The Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) property is located in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 10 and Oregon's 4th and 5th Congressional Districts.

The purpose of establishing and maintaining an Administrative Record is twofold. First, it establishes a record containing the documents that form the basis for selecting the response action. Second, it meets the CERCLA requirement for public involvement in determining the selected response alternative. An Administrative Record is required for all Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) projects at which removal actions are performed or at which a Remedial Investigation is performed.

The Administrative Record file contains documents providing the basis for decisions made on the project, and includes information such as relevant work plans, reports, decision documents, copies of regulations, and copies of press releases and fact sheets. The Administrative Record file is located and maintained at or near the site in a local information repository. This local information repository can be a public library, law enforcement office, city hall, school, or other location with easy public access.

 

Reports:

Archives Search Report

Archives Search Report Supplement

Maps/Site Layout

Revised Inventory Project Report

Final Site Inspection Report

Appendix A - Performance Work Statement

Sample Collection Log

Appendix G- Analytical Data QA/QC Report

Appendix F - Analytical Data

Analytical Summary Report

Quantitation Report

Analytical Data

Analytical Data

Final Site Specific Work Plan

 

Camp Adair HTRW Project

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The purpose of establishing and maintaining an Administrative Record is twofold. First, it establishes a record containing the documents that form the basis for selecting the response action. Second, it meets the CERCLA requirement for public involvement in determining the selected response alternative. An Administrative Record is required for all Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) projects at which removal actions are performed or at which a Remedial Investigation is performed.

The Administrative Record file contains documents providing the basis for decisions made on the project, and includes information such as relevant work plans, reports, decision documents, copies of regulations, and copies of press releases and fact sheets. The Administrative Record file is located and maintained at or near the site in a local information repository. This local information repository can be a public library, law enforcement office, city hall, school, or other location with easy public access.

 

The Administrative Record file is available at the following location:

 

Independence Public Library                         

175 Monmouth Street                                    

Independence, OR 97351

Prior to the Army’s acquisition and occupation of the former Camp Adair lands, farming was the predominant use of the land. Farming varied from small berry farms, orchards, and vineyards to larger general purpose and livestock farms. The surrounding area was also predominantly used for agriculture and forestry; a significant portion of the land is mountainous and forested.

In 1941, the War Department selected the Willamette Valley site for Camp Adair, centered on the small community of Wells, Oregon, north of Corvallis, Oregon. Willamette Valley was selected because its climate and natural land features were similar to that of Germany, the dispatch location for U.S. soldiers. The homes, farms, and cemeteries that made up the community of Wells were relocated in 1942 to allow for construction of Camp Adair. Built in six months, Camp Adair was 6 miles wide and 10 miles long and contained over 1,700 buildings including barracks, machine shops, stores, kitchens, theaters, hospitals, and chapels.

Four Infantry Divisions trained at Camp Adair from 1942 to 1944. The Army began to reduce its operations in the area and transferred the hospital to the Navy in 1944. Camp Adair also served as a prisoner of war camp until 1946, when the Army declared Camp Adair as surplus and it was assigned for disposition. All but 736 acres of the former Camp Adair and Adair AFS lands were transferred to various federal, state, and local governmental agencies, educational organizations, private companies, and individuals upon its closure. The land surrounding the former camp Adair was returned to its original farming use, and in 1950, approximately 1,700 acres (the cantonment area) was established as the ODFW EEWWA.

Between 1958 and 1969, the U.S. Air Force used Camp Adair for a Semi-Automatic Ground Environment (SAGE) support facility and started (but never completed) construction of a Bomarc launch facility on the remaining non-transferred lands. In 1970, the remaining lands were transferred to various federal, state, and local governmental agencies; educational organizations; and private companies and individuals.

Currently, the majority of the former Camp Adair is owned by ODFW and used for public day-use recreation, with a hunting season from September through February. The City of Adair Village owns other areas including the former Army hospital and U.S. Air Force housing and operations areas.  Other entities including Benton County, the Northwest Laborers-Employers Training Trust, and Santiam Christian Schools own facilities.  Adjacent areas to the north and west of the former Camp Adair are residential.

Camp Adair MMRP History/Documents

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DERP-FUDS PROPERTY NO. F10OR0029- CAMP ADAIR-ADAIR AFS

PROPERTY NAME:

Camp Adair/Adair Air Force Station (AFS)

LOCATION:

Camp Adair, which comprises approximately 56,815.17 acres, is located approximately 9 miles north of Corvallis, Oregon in Polk, Benton, and Linn counties. Camp Adair is located at approximately latitude 44° 42' 21" North and longitude 123° 14' 28" West. The Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) property is located in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 10 and Oregon's 4th and 5th Congressional Districts.

PROPERTY HISTORY:

Camp Adair was used primarily as a training facility for four infantry divisions between 1942 and 1945. The training activities included use of small arms, explosives, mortars, artillery, antiaircraft and antitank guns, and support by tanks and Army Air Forces aircraft. Other uses of the camp from 1944 to 1945 included bombing and gunnery practice for Navy/Marine pilots, storage facilities, a prisoner of war camp, and a Naval hospital. Camp Adair’s cantonment area and hospital was located east of Highway 99, while the live fire and maneuver areas were to the west.

Camp Adair was declared surplus and assigned for disposition in April 1946. In 1946 the property was transferred to the Department of Agriculture for sale by the Federal Land Bank. A War Department letter of August 1946 stated that Camp Adair had been "dedudded so as to make it reasonably safe for any use." A Certificate of Clearance was issued in March 1947. Portions of Camp Adair were purchased by the Oregon State College for apartment buildings and for Oregon State College forestry land. Other portions of Camp Adair were sold to private owners.

In 1955, after several years of military inactivity, the Air Force acquired property in present day Adair Village and portions of the former cantonment area for use as an air defense facility (Semi- Automatic Ground Environment System). Adair Air Force Station later served as Headquarters for the 26th Air Division North American Air Defense Command (NORAD), which provided air defense for seven western states. Adair Air Force Station was selected in 1959 as a location for the Bomarc Missile base, but construction of the base was not completed. From 1955 to 1964, Air Force munitions training activity was limited to the use of Skeet Range No. 580 in the cantonment area. In 1969, Adair Air Force Station was closed. In 1970, the Adair Air Force Station lands were determined excess and reported to the General Services Administration for transfer. The Oregon National Guard uses a former Army range, Known Distance Rifle Range No. 4, for small arms training and platoon-sized tactical training. The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) also uses the National Guard firing range for law enforcement officers.

As of 2006, over 1,000 individuals and agencies shared property ownership of the Camp Adair area. These owners include federal agencies (U.S. Forest Service), Oregon State agencies [Oregon State University, Parks and Recreation Department, Oregon National Guard, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW)], private industry, and private citizens. There is uncontrolled access to the property.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

Project 08:  Live Grenade Courts.  Project 08 is a Munitions Response Site (MRS) which consists of three non-contiguous grenade courts, previously identified as Live Grenade Court East, Live Grenade Court No. 129, and Live Grenade Court West. The MRS measures approximately 75 acres, and was used by the Army between 1942 and 1945. Grenade courts were used to provide realism, familiarization, and confidence to soldiers in the use of live explosive fragmentation grenades. Munitions associated with this MRS include both high explosive and practice grenades.

Project 09:  Explosive Munitions Ranges.  Project 09 is a Munitions Response Site (MRS) which consists of 19 individual ranges including a string of artillery, field combat ranges, and two bombing targets which ringed and overlapped the major impact area in the northern sector of Camp Adair, measuring a total of 15,455 acres. The MRS was actively used by the Army, Navy and Marine Corps for live fire combat maneuvers, and support coordination exercises between 1942 and 1945. Munitions associated with the MRS include small arms, artillery, mortars, anti-tank rockets, bombs, pyrotechnics, smokes, incendiaries, and demolition materials.

Project 12:  Field Combat Ranges.  Project 12 is a Munitions Response Site (MRS) which consists of three field combat ranges (No. 89, 89A, and 89C) and measures 1,324 acres. The MRS was actively used by the Army for live fire combat maneuver exercises between 1942 and 1945. All individual and crew-served conventional weapons were authorized use which included small arms and artillery.

DERP-FUDS MMRP PROJECT NO. F10OR002908 - Live Grenade Courts

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

The Live Grenade Courts Munitions Response Site (MRS) is comprised of 75 acres and includes three noncontiguous former hand grenade courts known as the East Live Hand Grenade Court, Live Hand Grenade Court No. 129, and the West Live Hand Grenade Court. These training ranges were used to provide realism, familiarity, and confidence to soldiers in the use of live explosive fragmentation grenades. Munitions associated with this MRS include both high explosive filled grenades and practice grenades, i.e. the MkII fragmentation hand grenade and the M21 practice hand grenade. Based on historical evidence, as documented in the Archive Search Report (ASR), munitions and explosives of concern (MEC) have been reported at the Live Hand Grenade Court No. 129 and the West Live Hand Grenade Court. No MEC has been reported at the East Live Hand Grenade Court. However, based on similar historical uses there is a similar risk for MEC. Potential contaminants include cast iron, trinitrotoluene (TNT), and smokeless powder. Land associated with East and West Court is farmed (agricultural), while the Court No. 129 is within the boundaries of an active Christmas tree farm.

During the SI field work, two sediment and three soil samples were collected. Analytical results were compared to site background values. No groundwater or surface water samples were collected. SI sampling results for munitions constituents (MC) show that concentrations of metals in sediment and soil are low and below both human health and ecological screening values. There were no detections of explosives in sediment or soil samples.

PROPOSED ACTIVITIES

Based on historical evidence and the Site Inspection field activities conducted, further investigation of the Live Grenade Courts MRS is warranted for MEC. No further investigation is warranted for MC.

DERP-FUDS MMRP PROJECT NO. F10OR002909 - Explosive Munitions Ranges

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

The Explosive Munitions Ranges Munitions Response Site (MRS) consists of 15,455 acres of land in an irregularly shaped parcel. It is a combination of three formerly-identified munitions response areas (MRA)/MRS's: Bombing Target No. 1, Range Complex No. 1, and Range Complex No. 2. Collectively, the MRS consists of 19 individual ranges including a string of artillery, field combat ranges, and two bombing targets which ringed and overlapped the major impact area in the northern sector of Camp Adair. The MRS was actively utilized for live fire combat maneuvers, and support coordination exercises between 1942 and 1945.

Weapons and munitions used on the MRS included .30-caliber rifles, automatic rifles, .30 and .50-caliber machine guns, anti-tank guns, 105-mm and 155-mm howitzers, 60 and 81-mm mortars, 2.36-inch anti-tank and practice rockets, bombs, simulators, smoke generating devices, incendiary and illumination devices, and demolition materials.

During the SI field work, no visual reconnaissance surveys were conducted in the MRS for the sole purpose of identifying munitions and explosives of concern (MEC). During sampling of the MRS, anomaly avoidance procedures were performed to avoid potential encounter with MEC or munitions debris (MD). No MEC or MD were observed. Much of the land within the MRS is currently being used for agriculture purposes and thus has been disturbed or reworked by tilling or grazing. Presence of MEC and MD was previously documented in the Archive Search Report (ASR) during which an unexploded 60mm mortar round was found and ultimately destroyed by local law enforcement. In addition, MD (60mm and 81mm mortars, and 105mm projectile) has been found.

Results of munitions constituents (MC) from groundwater, sediment, and surface soil samples collected during the SI show that concentrations of metals and explosives are below human health and ecological screening values.

PROPOSED ACTIVITIES

Based on the conclusions and recommendations presented in the Final Site Inspection Report, further investigation with regards to MEC is warranted. No further investigation is warranted for MC.

DERP-FUDS MMRP PROJECT NO. F10OR002912 - Field Combat Ranges

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

The Field Combat Ranges Munitions Response Site (MRS) consists of three field combat ranges (No. 89, 89A, and 89C) and measures 1,324 acres. Live fire combat maneuver exercises were conducted by the infantry units receiving training at Camp Adair. All individual and crew-served conventional weapons were authorized for the MRS including .22-caliber rifles, .30-caliber rifles, .30-caliber and .50-caliber machine guns, anti-tank guns, 105mm and 155mm howitzers. The project area is currently used for agricultural crop growing operations, Christmas tree growing, and residences.

No munitions and explosives of concern (MEC) or munitions debris (MD) has been reported at the Field Combat Ranges MRS. No MEC or MD was identified during the SI field work; however, field activities only included MEC avoidance in support of sampling.

Four surface soil samples, groundwater, surface soil, and sediment samples were collected from the MRS. No munitions constituents (MC) concentrations exceeded human health screening values. The ecological screening value for molybdenum was exceeded in the surface soil sample. Molybdenum, however, is not a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) hazardous substance.

PROPOSED ACTIVITIES

Based on the conclusions and recommendations presented in the Final Site Inspection Report, further investigation with regards to MEC is warranted. No further investigation is warranted for MC.

 

The purpose of establishing and maintaining an Administrative Record is twofold. First, it establishes a record containing the documents that form the basis for selecting the response action. Second, it meets the CERCLA requirement for public involvement in determining the selected response alternative. An Administrative Record is required for all Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) projects at which removal actions are performed or at which a Remedial Investigation is performed.

The Administrative Record file contains documents providing the basis for decisions made on the project, and includes information such as relevant work plans, reports, decision documents, copies of regulations, and copies of press releases and fact sheets.

Reports:

Archives Search Report,

Archives Search Report Supplement,

Maps/Site Layout,

Revised Inventory Project Report,

Final Site Inspection Report,

Appendix A - Performance Work Statement,

Sample Collection Log,

Appendix G- Analytical Data QA/QC Report,

Appendix F - Analytical Data,

Analytical Summary Report,

Quantitation Report,

Analytical Data,

Analytical Data,

Final Site Specific Work Plan

Contact

Kansas City District
601 E. 12th Street
Kansas City, Mo., 64106